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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
of pace in the u.s. senate. throughout its history, the united states senate has been the world's greatest deliberative body and sometimes they deliberate a little bit too long but the white house actually said that they supported the modest measures and it depends on where you are on the united states senate. sometimes when people want quick action now, those people were disappointed but if you believe in evolutional or gradual change as president obama sometimes does, you would end up taking that half or a third of a loaf. >> okay. so progressives, though, certainly have not had a good time hearing about this and specifically coming out and being very stern in reaction to harry reid. take a listen to rachel maddow. >> wow, harry reid, yeah. this is the day everybody was looking forward to in terms of changing how the senate operate and if you hear sad trombones, that's why. after the months, years of promises this time he was going to do it. but hey. at least we'll be able to see them get nothing done faster now. >> all right. so i had a chance to talk with ed schultz in hi hour disappoi
no recourse if that united states senate of an opposite party of the president decides we're shutting down the confirmation process because frankly, you know that can be done. is that -- i mean, you know, there are no recourse at all for the executive branch here? >> yeah, the next election is the recourse for the executive branch. >> that could be four years. could you hold up cabinet appointments for four years. >> it could be two years. of course, it could. the founders put that in the constitution there about 1 1100 positions in the government that require advice and consent. it's there for a purpose. i was nominated by the first president bush to be education secretary. the senate held me up for three months. they had a right to do it. so the president has to keep sending people until he finds someone who can gain the support of the senate. that's one of the checks we have against an imperial presidency. >> you hope the supreme court upholds this broad ruling that basically eliminates recess appointments? >> i do, but i doubt they will. but i suspect they will narrow the decision at l
, for this moment of being able to serve in this capacity. there is no one in the united states senate that has spent more time than you have on issues of importance to our country. the experience to develop of being on this committee and spending time abroad with world leaders, your wife at your site today, there's almost no one who has been that kind of time and effort, so i am happy for you. i know the many conversations we have had of the last two weeks. you're very anxious to serve. you're ready to go. my sense is your confirmation will go through very, very quickly. i do look for to your testimony today. secretary clinton is here today after a day of hearings both here and in the house, and that think you know you are inheriting a department that, like many departments, as members of challenges. we solve systemic issues that need to be addressed, and there in the process of being addressed right now. our nation as budgetary constraints, which means that in all of these departments creativity is going to have to be utilized to make sure that we make the most of what we have in making sure
the united states budget -- the united states senate has passed a budget. and now we have an opportunity to put pressure on the other body and that is to do their work. we don't do ourselves, we don't do our children, we don't do the taayers any favor by creating a climate that says folks dot have to do their work. we don't get to a solution or a remedy unless we pass budgets. this is an opportunity to get on record, to put the other body out into open fields so we can have a discussion and move this country on a pathway that makes sense. we ought to pass this and pass it quickly. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: i now yield one minute to mr. becerra, a member of our committee, and chairman of our caucus. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. becerra: you buy a house, you pay your mortgage. well, at least in this bill for three or four months. you want your kids to go to college, y take out a student loan, and you'll tell the bank, i'll pay for three, four months and we'll t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)